Benefits of Cinnamon, Honey, Ginger

Long ago, I read about the benefits of cinnamon for diabetics.  Thus I had been using cinnamon in my cooking and in making buns.

But today, I found out more cinnamon benefits.  I had posted three readings below.  You can also click the titles which will bring you to the actual websites.

Benefits of :

Honey

Cinnamon

Ginger

Readings 1:

Health Benefits of Honey and Cinnamon

The health benefits of honey and cinnamon include a strong immune system, digestive system, healthy heart, bones, skin, teeth, and hair, weight loss, itching, and arthritis. This article covers the health benefits of honey and cinnamon together. Honey comes with a number of health benefits when consumed individually, and when consumed in combination with a number of food items, the most useful combinations are formed with cinnamon, ginger, and milk.

The health benefits of honey and cinnamon include a strong immune system, digestive system, healthy heart, bones, skin, teeth, and hair, weight loss, itching, and arthritis. This article covers the health benefits of honey and cinnamon. Honey comes with a number of health benefits when consumed individually, and when consumed in combination with a number of food items, the most useful combinations are formed with cinnamon, ginger, and milk.

The health benefits of honey and cinnamon include the following:

  • Immune System: Honey and cinnamon paste is good for boosting the immune system, removing regular fatigue and increasing the longevity of an individual. It can also be used for treating colds and influenza.
  • Digestion: Honey and cinnamon helps in improving the digestive system, remove gas from the stomach and intestine and treat stomachache, flatulence, indigestion and bladder infections.
  • Itching: Paste of honey and cinnamon is often used to treat insect bites.
  • Skin Care: The benefits of honey and cinnamon extend to skin care, wherein minor skin infections and pimples are treated with regular application of a paste formed from these two precious foods.
  • Hair Care: Honey and cinnamon also nurture hair, reduce hair loss and further increase hair growth.
  • Dental Care: Both honey and cinnamon are individually used for dental care. A mixture prepared from the two is also useful in dental care, particularly in removing bad breath and toothache.
  • Weight Loss: A mixture of honey and cinnamon in warm water is considered good for reducing weight. Of course, like any other weight loss remedy, this comes true only when you ensure controlled diet and regular exercise.
  • Arthritis: The paste is good for bone health also and helps in providing some relief to arthritis patients.
  • Heart Disorders: Honey and cinnamon is used for reducing cholesterol levels and thus provide health to your heart.

It is also believed that honey and cinnamon is good for treating cancer, infertility in men and hearing disorders.

Readings 2:

Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum)

Cinnamon Benefits

Cinnamon is a herb traditionally used by many ancient cultures. It is indicated for a variety of ailments including gastrointestinal problems, urinary infections, relieving symptoms of colds and flu and has remarkable anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties. Some studies have shown that Cinnamon helps people with diabetes metabolise sugar better.

True cinnamon, or Cinnamomum Zeylanicum, is the inner bark of a small evergreen tree native to Sri Lanka and was used in ancient Egypt for embalming. It was also added to food to prevent spoiling. During the Bubonic Plague, sponges were soaked in cinnamon and cloves and placed in sick rooms. Cinnamon was the most sought after spice during explorations of the 15th and 16th centuries.

Most therapeutic uses of Chinese cinnamon bark are rooted in its historical use as a traditional medicine and on laboratory and animal studies. Test-tube or animal research does not guarantee safety or effectiveness in humans, but German health authorities (Commission E) do approve of cinnamon bark for mild gastrointestinal spasms, stimulating appetite and relieving indigestion.

It is used in flatulent dyspepsia, dyspepsia with nausea, intestinal colic and digestive atony associated with cold & debilitated conditions. It is known to relieve nausea and vomiting, and because of its mild astringency it is particularly used for infantile diarrhea.

Cinnamon warms and stimulates the digestive system, useful in weak digestion, colic, griping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, wind and distension. The tannins have an astringent action, stemming bleeding in nosebleeds, heavy periods and resolving diarrhea and catarrhal congestion.

Cinnamon may help to:

Soothe an upset stomach:

Cinnamon extracts have been used medically to treat gastrointestinal problems and to help calm the stomach. Cinnamon is a carminative, an agent that helps break up intestinal gas that has traditionally been used to combat diarrhea and morning sickness. Both test-tube and some animal studies have found that cinnamon may help to relieve mild abdominal discomfort caused by excess gas.

Clear up urinary-tract infections:

One German study showed that Cinnamon “suppresses completely” the cause of most urinary-tract infections (Escherichia coli bacteria) and the fungus responsible for vaginal yeast infections (Candida albicans).

Allow diabetics to use less insulin:

Some studies have shown that Cinnamon helps people with diabetes metabolise sugar better. In adult-onset (Type II) diabetes, the pancreas produces insulin, but the body can’t use it efficiently to break down blood sugar.

Richard Anderson at the US Department of Agriculture’s Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland found that Cinnamon enhances the ability of insulin to metabolise glucose, helping to control blood sugar levels. Cinnamon contains the anti-oxidant glutathione and a type of flavonoid called MHCP (methylhydroxy chalcone polymer). It is believed that cinnamon makes fat cells much more responsive to insulin, the hormone that regulates sugar metabolism and thus controls the level of glucose in the blood.

“One-eighth of a teaspoon of cinnamon triples insulin efficiency,” say James A. Duke, Ph.D., a botanist retired from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and author of The CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. Dr. Duke suggest that people with adult-onset diabetes discuss Cinnamon’s benefits with their doctor. Taking ½ to ¾ teaspoon of ground Cinnamon with each meal may help control blood sugar levels.

Aid digestion:

Cinnamon contains compounds called catechins, which help relieve nausea. The volatile oil in cinnamon bark may also help the body to process food by breaking down fats during digestion.

Kill many disease-causing fungi and viruses:

Preliminary results from test tube and animal studies suggest that cinnamon oil and cinnamon extract have anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, and anti-parasitic properties. For example, cinnamon has been found to be active against Candida albicans, the fungus responsible for vaginal yeast infections and thrush (oral yeast infection), Helicobacter pylori (the bacteria that causes stomach ulcers), and even head lice.

An incredible experiment in the journal of Food Science for 1974 demonstrated the power of cinnamon over most yeasts and fungi. Slices of white, raisin, rye and whole wheat breads, manufactured without the usual mold inhibitors, were subjected to various aflatoxins, a group of toxic molds so dangerous that they can cause liver cancer and kill humans and animals alike and often occur in food. The toxic molds grew vigorously on all of the other breads, except for the raisin bread where growth was described as being “scant or not visible at all.” In trying to identify whether it was the raisins or cinnamon responsible for this, food scientists discovered that as little as 2% or 20 mg. of the spice per ml of a yeast-extract and sucrose broth inhibited 97 -99 per cent of these molds.

Relieve Pain:

Cinnamon is considered a pain-killer due to its prostaglandin-inhibiting action.

Relieve Colds and Flu:

In both India and Europe, cinnamon has been traditionally taken as a warming herb for “cold” conditions, often in combination with ginger (Zingiber officinale). The herb stimulates the circulation, especially to the fingers and toes and has been used for arthritis. Cinnamon is also a traditional remedy for aching muscles and other symptoms of viral conditions such as colds and flue.

Note:

Cinnamon bark is generally safe to use in medicinal amounts, but allergic skin rashes or mucous membrane reactions are possible. Spice workers have occasionally developed asthma and some people have had allergic reactions to cinnamon chewing gum. Very large amounts of cinnamon bark could cause dangerous nervous system reactions.

Do not use:

  • during pregnancy due to cinnamon’s emmenagogic effect.
  • if you suffer from stomach or intestinal ulcers due to the carminative effect.

Readings 3:

Cinnamon

The Benefits of Cinnamon for Those with High Blood Sugar
A study shows that adding a little cinnamon to the diet can help to lower the blood sugar of diabetics and others with blood sugar problems. The findings show that one of the benefits of cinnamon is that it can lower blood sugar levels on average by 20% in a matter of weeks.

The Benefits of Cinnamon for Those with High Cholesterol
The same study also found that including cinnamon in the diet can lower levels of bad cholesterol. Because bad cholesterol is partially controlled by insulin, when blood sugar is lowered, the chance of bad cholesterol lowering occurs.

How to Include the Benefits of Cinnamon into Your Diet
Since adding a gooey cinnamon bun to your daily diet would do more harm than good, how can you add more cinnamon without hitting the baked goods?

Try adding a cinnamon stick to a cup of tea or sprinkling some on oatmeal or grits. Look for recipes that add cinnamon to soups or vegetables. Cinnamon is used for more than just baked goods so try some new recipes.

Finally, if you are already taking medicine to lower your blood sugar or your cholesterol, you should check with your doctor before adding cinnamon to your diet.

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About column01

My hobbies: Baking Fishing Surfing the net Travel Shopping.... so many more activities if my health allows....

16 responses to “Benefits of Cinnamon, Honey, Ginger”

  1. Vince Patrick says :

    Sounds like good advice ,all I need now is what quantities to mix and with what .I’ve just had a bad bout of Bronchitis which required plenty of Antibiotics ,so now I’ve got to get rid of the after effects,,of Urinary retention and Gas. Thanks,Vince.

  2. column01 says :

    Ginger is vy gd for inflammation. I usually go according to my own taste.

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